Do all fish have eyes?

Do all fish have eyes?

No. Fish that live more than 800 meters below the ocean’s surface do not have eyes.

Is a lightning bolt hotter than the sun?

Lightning is 5 times hotter than the sun. Lighting can reach temperatures of 30,000 kelvins (53,540 degrees Fahrenheit). Compare that to the surface of the sun, 6,000 kelvins (10,340 degrees Fahrenheit).

How long is a nanosecond?

A nanosecond (ns) is an SI unit of time equal to one billionth of a second (10−9 or 1/1,000,000,000 s). One nanosecond is to one second as one second is to 31.71 years. The word nanosecond is formed by the prefix nano and the unit second. Its symbol is ns.

What were Johnny Appleseed’s apples really for?

Yes, there was a real John Chapman who planted thousands of apple trees on U.S. soil. But the apples on those trees were much more bitter than the ones you’d find in the supermarket today. “Johnny Appleseed” didn’t expect his fruits to be eaten whole, but rather made into hard apple cider.

Is mixed spice the same as all spice?

Allspice is the dried, unripe berry from a tropical evergreen tree, Pimenta dioica, which is native to the Caribbean and parts of the central Americas. Unlike Allspice, which is a single spice, Schwartz Mixed Spice is a blend of several spices, including Cinnamon, Coriander Seed, Caraway, Nutmeg, Ginger and Cloves.

Why does turkey make you sleepy?

Contrary to popular belief, eating turkey isn’t the main reason you feel sleepy after a Thanksgiving feast. The oft-repeated turkey myth stems from the fact that turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan, which forms the basis of brain chemicals that make people tired.

How much money does Michael Jordan make in a year?

Jordan’s net worth is estimated at $650 million thanks to years of endorsement checks and $90 million in salary from the Bulls. Jordan’s net worth has the potential to surge through his 80% stake in the Bobcats.

How long was a Roman mile?

The Romans used a unit of distance called the mille passum, which literally translated into “a thousand paces.” Since each pace was considered to be five Roman feet—which were a bit shorter than our modern feet—the mile ended up being 5,000 Roman feet, or roughly 4,850 of our modern feet.