How many sides does a TRIACONTAGON have?

How many sides does a TRIACONTAGON have?

In geometry, a triacontagon is a thirty-sided polygon. The sum of any triacontagon’s interior angles is 5040 degrees. One interior angle in a regular triacontagon is 168°, meaning that one exterior angle would be 12°.

Why does your stomach growl when you are hungry?

The stomach muscle contractions also help to make you hungry, so you eat more food that your body needs. When these muscle contractions get going again and your stomach is empty, those gas and air pockets make a lot more noise that you hear as stomach growling.

How many women have won the Nobel Prize?

The Nobel Prize and Prize in Economic Sciences have been awarded to women 47 times between 1901 and 2014. Only one woman, Marie Curie, has been honoured twice, with the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics and the 1911 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Why are there 60 seconds in a minute?

THE DIVISION of the hour into 60 minutes and of the minute into 60 seconds comes from the Babylonians who used a sexagesimal (counting in 60s) system for mathematics and astronomy. They derived their number system from the Sumerians who were using it as early as 3500 BC.

What does fire in the hole mean?

“Fire in the hole” is a warning that an explosive detonation in a confined space is imminent. It originated with miners, who needed to warn their fellows that a charge had been set.

Which animal’s eye is bigger than its brain?

Ostrich has the biggest eyes in the whole animal kingdom. Its eye is bigger than its brain. Ostriches don’t hide their head in the sand. They will lay their head on the ground if they sense a danger.

What year was the first lighthouse built?

1716 – First lighthouse built in the United States was Boston Lighthouse built on Little Brewster Island. This lighthouse was destroyed during the Revolutionary War and was rebuilt in 1783 and still stands today.

Who sings ‘Sign Sign Everywhere a Sign?’

“Signs” is a song by the Canadian rock group Five Man Electrical Band. It was written by Les Emmerson and popularized the relatively unknown band, who recorded it for their second album, Good-byes and Butterflies in 1970.