What diseases can you get from lack of vitamin C?

What diseases can you get from lack of vitamin C?

Scurvy is a disease caused by a diet that lacks vitamin C (ascorbic acid). Patients develop anemia, debility, exhaustion, edema (swelling) in some parts of the body, and sometimes ulceration of the gums and loss of teeth. The name scurvy comes from the Latin scorbutus.

What states can you see from Lookout Mountain?

From the “Rock City” it is said that seven U.S. states can be seen: Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia and Alabama.

Is balsa a hardwood or softwood?

Balsa wood is one of the lightest, least dense woods there is, and it’s considered a hardwood. The distinction between hardwood and softwood actually has to do with plant reproduction. All trees reproduce by producing seeds, but the seed structure varies.

What was the last film personally overseen by Walt Disney?

The Jungle Book (1967) – Trivia – IMDb. The Jungle Book (1967) The last film personally overseen by Walt Disney.

Why does root beer foam with ice cream?

As usual, science comes to the rescue to explain the foamy goodness that tops an ice-cold root beer float. When carbonated root beer comes into contact with the ice cream, carbon dioxide bubbles are released. Likewise, the soda helps to free air bubbles trapped in the ice cream.

Where do Danish pastries come from?

Although today known world-wide as “Danishes” these pastries did not originate in Denmark, but were brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers, particularly from Vienna in the 1850’s when Danish pastry workers went on a long-term wage strike.

What was Uncle Sam’s real name?

On this day in 1813, the United States gets its nickname, Uncle Sam. The name is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812.

Who was the first to walk on the moon?

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first humans on the Moon, Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, on July 20, 1969, at 20:18 UTC. Armstrong became the first to step onto the lunar surface six hours later on July 21 at 02:56 UTC.