What is selective law enforcement?

What is selective law enforcement?

Selective enforcement is the ability that executors of the law (such as police officers or administrative agencies, in some cases) have to arbitrarily select choice individuals as being outside of the law.

Is a mongoose immune to snake venom?

The Indian gray mongoose and others are well known for their ability to fight and kill venomous snakes, particularly cobras. They are adept at such tasks due to their agility, thick coats, and acetylcholine receptors, which render them resistant or immune to snake venom.

How many feet is it from earth to outer space?

There is no firm boundary where space begins. However the Kármán line, at an altitude of 100 km (62 mi) above sea level, is conventionally used as the start of outer space in space treaties and for aerospace records keeping.

When did Greenwich Mean Time start?

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was adopted as the world’s time standard at the Washington Meridian Conference in 1884. This conference also established Universal Time, from which the international 24-hour time-zone system grew. This is why all time zones refer back to GMT on the prime meridian.

How fast can The Flash run?

Comic book Flash can hit far faster than light, Light travels over 186,000 miles per second. So the answer is, Flash runs much faster than 186,000 miles per second.

How many times did Jackie Robinson won the World Series?

Robinson played in six World Series, but only won one in 1955 against the New York Yankees in a seven game series.

Who is John Dalton?

John Dalton FRS (6 September 1766 – 27 July 1844) was an English chemist, meteorologist and physicist. He is best known for his pioneering work in the development of modern atomic theory, and his research into colour blindness (sometimes referred to as Daltonism, in his honour).

What did Louis XIV do to a boy who made fun of his bald head?

In 1674, when he was visiting a school at Clermont, he heard from the school’s authorities that one of the children, a nine- year-old Irish lad named Francis Seldon, had made a pun about the king’s bald head.
Louis was furious. He had a secret warrant drawn up for the child’s arrest, and young Seldon was thrown into solitary confinement in the Bastille. His parents, members of one of Europe’s richest merchant families, were told simply that the child had disappeared. Days turned to months, months to years, and Louis himself passed away. But Francis spent sixty-nine years “in the hole” for making fun of the king’s baldness.