What oath does a doctor take?

What oath does a doctor take?

Hippocratic Oath: Modern Version. I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant: I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

What musical instrument does Sherlock Holmes play for relaxation?

In Arthur Conan Doyle’s story The Cardboard Box, it transpires that Sherlock Holmes owns and plays a violin made by Antonio Stradivarius himself.

How many countries have a mcdonalds?

McDonald’s Corp. is the world’s largest restaurant chain, with 34,480 restaurants in 119 countries. The burger chain has famously gone where few fast-food chains have gone before as a symbol—for better or worse – of capitalism.

Who owns all the land in Canada?

All physical land in Canada is the property of the Crown, Queen Elisabeth 11. There is no provision in the Canada Act, or in the Constitution Act 1982 which amends it, for any Canadian to own any physical land in Canada.

Do yellow jackets die after they sting you?

Yellow jackets are more aggressive than other stinging insects such as wasps, hornets, mud daubers or bees. Yellowjackets can sting and bite. Since they don’t lose their stinger, they can sting numerous times, and will do so unprovoked.

Is a contraction one word or two?

Contracted words count as the number of words they would be if they were not contracted. For example, isn’t, didn’t, I’m, I’ll are counted as two words (replacing is not, did not, I am, I will). Where the contraction replaces one word (e.g. can’t for cannot ), it is counted as one word.

Which animal sleeps 22 hours a day?

The sleepiest animal in the world is the koala, who sleeps 22 hours a day. Next is the sloth (20 hours), armadillo and opossum (tied at 19 hours each), lemur (16 hours), then hamster and squirrel (tied at 14 hours each).

Are people from Holland called Dutch?

There are three terms we need to define: Holland, the Netherlands, and Dutch. In Old English dutch simply meant “people or nation.” (This also explains why Germany is called Deutschland in German.) Over time, English-speaking people used the word Dutch to describe people from both the Netherlands and Germany.