When did they move the goal posts to the back of the end zone?

When did they move the goal posts to the back of the end zone?

Goal posts were originally kept on the goal lines, but after they began to interfere with play, they moved back to the end lines in 1927, where they have remained in college football ever since. The National Football League moved the goal posts up to the goal line again in 1932, then back again to the end line in 1974.

What color are the police lights in Italy?

Police used to have blue-colored emergency lights but after a recent restock of vehicles, now the use of both blue and red color is usual. Fire Departments make use of red only emergency light while ambulances either use red or both colors.

What is the shortest war in history?

The shortest war in history was between Zanzibar and England in 1896. Zanzibar surrendered after 38 minutes.

How many half steps are in an octave?

Octaves can be perfect, augmented or diminished. Below you can see that the number of steps determines the quality of the interval: Perfect octave, 6 whole steps or 12 half steps: Augmented octave, 6 1/2 whole steps or 13 half steps

How many calories do you burn by banging your head?

 Banging your head against a wall burns 150 calories an hour.

Where were two famous ancient Greek battles fought?

The War fought between the two leading city-states in ancient Greece, Athens and Sparta. Description: The Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) took place between the Athenian empire and Peloponnesian league lead by the Spartans. The Peloponnesian league was a coalition of the Thebes, Corinth and Sparta.

Where is the biggest tree in the world?

The General Sherman is a giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) tree located in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in Tulare County, in the U.S. state of California. By volume, it is the largest known living single stem tree on earth.

Where did the word dad come from?

Even the Oxford English Dictionary throws its hands up and admits “of the actual origin we have no evidence.” But, the OED continues, “the forms dada and tata, meaning ‘father,’ originating in infantile or childish speech, occur independently in many languages.” In other words, “dad” might come from baby babble and entered adult vocabulary from there as “dad,” but it’s not a sure thing.