Who invented liquid paper?

Who invented liquid paper?

Bette Nesmith Graham. Bette Claire Graham (March 23, 1924 – May 12, 1980) was an American typist, commercial artist, and the inventor of Liquid Paper. She was also the mother of musician and producer Michael Nesmith of The Monkees.

What kind of alcohol is safe to drink?

Ethanol is the only alcohol that is safe to drink till today. To the layman, the term: ‘alcohol’ is widely used rather than the chemist term ethyl alcohol or ethanol.

What airline company is named after a Greek letter?

Delta is named after its original company Delta Air Service, which was a crop dusting and then passenger and mail service, serving the Mississippi Delta region. They are not named after a Greek letter (well, not directly, anyway).

How did mark twain get his name?

The real person was Samuel Langhorne Clemens. When he began writing, he chose the nom de plume, or pen name, of “Mark Twain.” “Mark Twain” is a riverboat term measuring two fathoms (12 feet) in depth: mark (measure) twain (two).

What unit of time is a “jiffy”

A jiffy is a unit of time equivalent to 1/100th of a second. Likely, there is almost nothing humanly possible that can be accomplished in a “jiffy.”

Why does February have 29 days?

February 29 is a date that usually occurs every four years, and is called leap day. This day is added to the calendar in leap years as a corrective measure, because the Earth does not orbit around the sun in precisely 365 days. The Gregorian calendar is a modification of the Julian calendar first used by the Romans.

Is Kobe Bryant named after beef?

His parents named him after the famous beef of Kobe, Japan, which they saw on a restaurant menu. Bryant was raised Roman Catholic. When Bryant was six, his father left the NBA and moved his family to Rieti in Italy to continue playing professional basketball.

How fast is Mach 1 at sea level?

At Standard Sea Level conditions (corresponding to a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius), the speed of sound is 340.3 m/s (1225 km/h, or 761.2 mph, or 661.5 knots, or 1116 ft/s) in the Earth’s atmosphere.